Glossary for Newbies

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LaBlueGirl
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Glossary for Newbies

Post by LaBlueGirl »

GLOSSARY OF TERMS
Which may be useful in Googling and understanding a little bit more about hacking/cracking etc. Keep in mind this list is by no means comprehensive nor exhaustive. It is merely a primer to assist you in understanding and learning.

1. Hacker: Someone technologically adept with computers such as programming, problem solving, electronic devices and software. A computer user who is able to gain entry into a computer or system to expose vulnerabilities or test security. A person called a hacker in proper jargon is mostly the person who finds the solution within minutes where a dozen graduate programmers fainted only by watching at the output code of the bug. (Stories and legends at M.I.T. still go round)

2. Bug: Windows Internet Explorer after six month of unpatched usage.

3. Cracker: Similar to but different than a hacker. A cracker is someone who breaks into computers, can bypass security or remove copy protection from software or exploits weaknesses in software. A cracker usually operates with malicious intent, blackmails the company for money or re-sells the obtained information to third parties.

4. Server: A computer that relays information to other computers and is connected by a network. The client (you) requests information by making a connection to the server on a specific protocol. Servers can also refer to the software that makes the act of serving possible. (Ex): WWW-servers, FTP-servers; SMTP (Mail) servers, POP (Post-Office-Protocol)-servers (allegedly named *Point of Presence*).

5. Web Server: A computer using software that delivers web pages on the HTTP protocol. A website is hosted on a web server and is called a web 'realm'.

6. HTTP: Hyper Text Transfer Protocol. The protocol which enables Web browsing.

7. Host: a computer on a network. Localhost (127.0.01): your computer as 'local-host'.
Remote-host : that other computer to which you receive and sent data to. Any computer that is not yours.

8. WWW: Robot-rules.

9. Port: Software on a socket communication represented and assigned (http://www.iana.org/assignments/port-numbers) numeric values as over UDP/TCP. A client machine would like access to something specific on a remote machine and connects to the standard/assigned ports on the server. Standard/assigned ports are (Ex): "80" for HTTP, "22" for FTP, etc.. Ports are either public, reserved or proprietary. When they are reserved like port 131 to 137 (NetBIOS), or blizwow 3724/tcp -> World of Warcraft, only tele-communication on that port will work with the specific software company that has a software patent over those ports. Security flaws begin here.

10. UDP: User Datagram Protocol. Transports data as a connectionless protocol using packet switching.

11. Packet Switching: Protocols in which messages are divided into packets before they are sent. Each packet is transmitted individually and can follow different routes to its destination. The packets are then reassembled at the destination.

12. Socket: Combination IP address and port number. A wrapper around software to make the hardware or other software do `things'. Note: many believe it is the socket that controls the software because the socket is closer to the hardware or similar mystical reasons. It is the opposite: software talks to the socket on how to use devices or to communicate with other software or processes. Your browser uses a socket to communicate to your ethernetcard and surf over Internet.

13. Ethernet: Common LAN wiring and can handle many Mb's per second.

14. Buffer: A temporary storage which handles data being sent or received. Normally, two different devices have different speeds and capabilities for handling data flow. The buffer mediates how much data is being sent and received at speeds the devices can handle. Think of 'buffer' as 'how much can this thing take in the stomach in one round'. (Ex): a webserver can handle for example, a maximum of 300 requests at a time. Each request is called a 'thread' and allocated (reserved a required amount) to the buffer. 'Threads' make 'child-threads' that have to be handled according to the buffer capacities. The webserver is configured to either reject or to accept the parent-thread and all its child-processes. When you see a 'web-connection' saying 'Connection: keep-alive' it means the buffer will do its best to handle all the threads from the same client.

15. Process(es): A running instance of a program.

16. Buffer Overflow: This happens when more data is put into the buffer area than the buffer can handle. This can result in system crashes, especially d0s (Denial Of Service: the server says `argh..f*ck off and it crashes).
On improperly configured or written software, an open backdoor is the result of a buffer-overflow. Since the service crashed, it now allows all other operations or transmits the exit-status of the last operation as 'regular' and 'Ok' to the system or parent-process just before fainting.

17. Exit-status: When a program terminates, crashes or is shutdown (closed), it sends a 'status' to its parent process. Programs do not just close and disappear, they send reports to logfiles. (Ex): the unreadeable thing you get on Windows "This program is not responding: Error 0x8e500..whatever...".
That's .. an 'exit-status'.

18. Log file: A file that lists actions that have occurred.

19. Backdoor: A type of remote controlled software that allows a third party to to covertly control system resources. Can allow access to a computer without the user's knowledge or the need for common security settings such as passwords, firewall settings and IP-routing (Intranet, LAN, VPN, etc..).
A Backdoor 'crack' is often the result of a tamed service by buffer-overflow.

20. Intranet: Inter-connected network within one organization which uses Web technology for sharing information internally and not world wide.

21. VPN: Virtual Private Network. Portions of a network are connected via the internet but any information sent is encrypted. Uses the internet as a medium for transporting data.

22. Packet: Generic term for a bundle of data organized in a specific way for transmission commonly called 'chunks'. Each packet has a `header' (system defined control information that precedes user information), a 'body' and a checksum (count of the number of bits in a transmission so the receiver can see if the same number that was sent is the number which arrives) to have a very well organized order and firm control in case they do not arrive at the destination in the exact sent order. (That happens !!). Contains the destination address. A packet is followed by a SYN-message (synchronize. A control bit occupying one sequence number to indicate where the sequencing starts) and an ACK-signal (acknowledgment. When a computer sends data the receiving computer sends an ackowledgement the data was received) by the remote machine(s) that respond to the proper SYN and ACK signals of the packages sent. When any file (email, URL request, image file etc) is sent over the internet, the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) of the TCP/IP layer breaks the data into chunks to be reassembled at the destination.

23. Protocol: The "language" spoken between computers to help them exchange information.

24. TCP: A protocol used on the internet to handle transmission of data. TCP keeps track of the packets and ensures the data arrives in the same order in which it was sent. (That is why IP was not 'enough..')
Be sure to read ISO-layer and levels of interpolarity of importance between protocols, usually from indispensable to ephemeral:
-IP
-ARP
-TCP over IP
-NAT
-DNS
-NFS
-WWW & Plug & Play

25. IP: Internet Protocol which handles data transmission but while TCP keeps track of packets and their order, IP is involved with handling the delivery of the packets.

26. Packet Sniffer: A device or program that monitors data being sent between computers on a network. Usually puts itself into the device drivers of the network card to gain access to data, especially the SYN, ACKs and checksums of the packets trailing one after the other.

27. Drivers: Small programs that tell your computer what the hardware/peripheral is and how it is to work properly with your OS.

28. .exe: A file extension that denotes the file is an "executable". Usually programs. A Windows type of file when clicked launches or installs a program.

29. Hyperlink: Text or images that when clicked transport the user to another page or a different location on the same page.

30. LAN: Local Area Network. A local (home, office or group of computers in the same area) network for communication between computers. Has a fast data transmission rate. Also may connect devices such as printers, word processors and storage units.

31. MAC Address: Media Access Control address. A unique code for most forms of networking hardware. Allows the DHCP server to authenticate the user and allow access to the network severs and the Internet/Intranet network.

32. DHCP Server: Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol. A protocol that dynamically assigns IP addresses in an organization's network so each time a user logs into the network (TCP/IP) it is automatically allocated an IP address. The device retains the address for a specified period of time called a `lease' that goes from 1 to 32 hours.

33.Dynamic: an operation that occurs on an as-needed basis for a period of time.

34. DNS: Domain Name Service. A program running on a server which translates the domain names from (Ex): www.domainname.com to 60.529.69.69.

35. Firewall: Usually software that limits access between networks by set security parameters. Prevents unauthorized access from the outside and can be thought of as a gateway between a "trusted" source (your home PC) and an "unsafe" source, such as the Internet. Advanced firewalls like SmoothWall allow a Red zone, an Orange zone and a Green zone.

36. Steganography: The process of hiding data in other data (a message hidden in an image).

37. Encryption: A way of encoding sensitive material so if it is intercepted or viewed by a third party it is undecipherable. Uses an algorithmic process to transform data into material which has a low probablity of assigning meaning without some sort of key or confidential process.

38. Decryption: The process of "unscrambling" an encrypted or coded message.

39. Algorithm: A mathmatical step-by-step procedure to find the solution of a given problem and terminates in a finite time. The model of a program written in step-by-step instructions.

40. Proxy: A computer network service that allows people to connect to a remote machine (the proxy). The proxy server then allows the user to request information from other hosts they choose. The proxy hides the user's IP address, substituting it with its own or another spoofed IP.

41. Remailer: A server computer that receives messages and sends them to the next available remailer without revealing who or where they came from until the message is finally dropped into the appropriate recipient's email box. Not to be confused with anonymizers.

42.Anonymizers: An online service that encrypts (unreversably) all transmitted data and passes it to the next remailer or anonymizer. Mostly used for anonymous email or very-very private comunication: two persons sending encrypted mails, each encrypted again many times anonymizer by anonimizer until recipient is reached.
It is impossible to decode encrypted data found on anonymizers. Hence it is also strictly forbidden to use them. Note also: much of what you absolutely abhor uses anonymizers and remailers. That is: kiddie-pr0n.
So don't feed those things.

43. Phishing: The act of tricking someone into giving information or having them do something they normally wouldn't do. The common approach is to pretend to be a legitimate business, send a fake email to a person and request private and/or personal information. The information may be credit card information, passwords and account information and social security numbers.

44. Social Engineering: The art and science of getting people to comply with your wishes. Obtaining information from people by utilizing the trust most people have in another's word ("I have a friend who works in your company and it happens that he lost his password and.." or "I bought your software and during the hurricane my house was washed away"...)

45. Keylogger: A computer program that captures the keystrokes of users and stores them. Some keyloggers send the information to the third party who wanted the information in the first place. Can be used for passwords and encryption keys while bypassing other security measures.

46. Brute Force Attack: Systematically going through every possible answer until the correct one is found. Used for obtaining passwords. Exhausts every possible key for deciphering until something readable is formed.

47. Dictionary Attack: An attack that uses brute force technique of successively trying all words in an exhaustive list. (Usually the dictionary, hence the name).

48. Rootkit: Set of programs that captures passwords and message traffic to and from computers. Can create backdoors, alter log files, attack other machines on the network and alter detection tools to mask its presence.

49. Spoofing: An attempt to gain access to a system by masquerading as a user. Impersonating a server to gain access to personal information.

50.Forging: Imitating or impersonating someone else in emails, USENET, shopping websites et al by spoofing techniques.

51.Website Defacement: An intruder compromises a webserver and changes the content on the site.

52.Warez: Cracked or pirated versions of commercial software.

53. Crack: (or to crack) The process of removing encoded copy prevention from software usually by reverse engineering.

54.Reverse Engineering: Process of learning how something is made by taking it apart and examining it usually with the intention of constructing a new device or program similar to the original. If you know how something works, then you know how to alter or remove it.

55. Keygen: (Key Generator) A program that can automatically generate a key, serial number or registration number for software. Be warned, if you download one it may have a virus!!!!!!

56. Bot: Programs with artificial inteligence that carry out the work of the person who is using them. Can be used to crawl the web. Those are usually sent out by search engines to scan through web pages for content display in the search result's page. Also can be called a "spider" or 'crawler'.

57. Cloaking: Process by which a site can display different content under differnt circumstances. To show an optimized page to search engines and a "regular" page to people visitng the site. Server-side technology which determines if the visiting IP is a spider or a human. If a spider, the server feeds an optimized page. Also called IP spoofing, IP cloaking and IP delivery.

58. Server-side: An application or a component that runs on a server rather than a client.

59. Client-side: Operations performed by the client in a client-server relationship.[/b]

Authored by LaBlueGirl and Frankb

If anyone has anything to add or correct, please do so!!!! Thank you!!
"Hey, Crash!
Ever tried walking with no legs?

It's real slow!"
~Crunch, Crash Bandicoot TTR

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Post by Necrix »

Check out the Jargon Files. :)

later.
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MORE TERMS

Post by LaBlueGirl »

Parsing: Process by which programming data is broken into smaller more distinct chunks of data that can be interpreted more easily and acted upon. Translates a string of charcters into logical units that a computer can act upon.

String: Linear sequence of symbols, character token, numbers or mixed.

Rendering: In computer graphics, rendering is the process of generating pixels of an image from a high level (complicated) description of the image's components. You have a complicated description of an image and you get the actual image displayed from rendering. In gaming, most new games require new graphics rendering software. Without this, the game either runs slowly or the graphics are POO!

Rendering-engine : Software that takes web content (HTML, XML, image files) and formatting content (CSS) and displays the content on your screen. It interprets and translates the computer language into something understood by the human user or an aural device and even Braille devices.
A browser uses a rendering engine. Browser-developers often share versions of the same rendering engine; MacOSx & Konqueror, Firefox & Netscape Navigator or they fight each other for copyrights (Opera vs Microsoft).

CGI: Common Gateway Interface. This term is too wide too develop here. Briefly, it is an Interface (Server<->Client), that gets through a Gateway to handle all sort of things that are quite Common to programmers.
For your amusement and distraction:
those 'cgi-bin' things you bounce on while surfing on the Internet, that's a directory where webdevelopers put CGI-scripts. Due to the well-known laziness of system-administrators and webdevelopers, CGI has been and still is a major security issue.

SSI: Server-Side Includes. Embedded directives that look like the HTML comment tag structure and which directs a web server to dynamically generate data for the web page upon request. SSI uses a very strict rule of step by step procedural syntax, unlike PHP or Perl which are more flexible. ASP.NET as server-side language, on its turn, is very strict and undisciplined developers often end in "spaghetti-code" and their webpages do not always work too well..
SSI enables web pages to include pieces of information that is not directly stored in its file. Pages with SSI mostly have the .shtml extension. In ASP.NET, they just have the .aspx extention although the syntax is quite the same:
ex: <!--#include virtual="file/there.foo" -->

TLD: Top Level Domain. When they gave the .COM extention to Microsoft component files in Redmond, they never knew what havoc that would create when the first DotComs arose : www.example.com. ".com" is a TLD, like,
-org : organisation, educational, or for sociological/political reasons.
-edu: educational, mostly the TLD of famous universities and institutes like Berkeley, MIT and Syracuse.
-biz
-net
-info
-gov
-mil
-xxx (not a prank, IANA is about to accept a TLD especially for 'adult-content sites!)
- by country : .ac, ,.ad,.ae,.af., de,.us,.co.uk,.cx,,.be,.mor, .au,.fr etc..
a list is available here : http://www.iana.org/cctld/cctld-whois.htm.

ISO-Compliancy: Verification that a proposed standard has met the criteria of those developing the standard.

ISO: International Standards Organization. ISO is an international organization which maintains the standards for all electronic applications in the global industry.

ANSI: American National Standards Institute. Develops national consensus for a wide variety of devices and procedures. Coordianted with ISO and IETF

IETF: Internet Engineering Task Force, the 'military/rigourous' version of the OSI & ANSI & IANA.

IANA: Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (where the bossy nerds are, really..)

ASCII: American Standard Code for Information Interchange. A code that represents letters, numerals, punctuation marks and control signals as eight bit groups. Standard code for transmission of data. Assigns a number for each key ranging from 0 to 127. Doesn't have special formatting features so it can be read by most computer systems.

.dll (Dynamic Link Library): an *.exe, especially full-packed programs, call a DLL for further instructions, mostly given input by the *.exe. The DLL manages the proper output, passes it to the *.exe so that one can make its nice windows and forms and buttons and other widgets. DLLs can be somewhat of a black box, as you don't really need to know what's inside them, just what they do. Exactly.

.ini: INI is a file name extension used in Microsoft Windows. The letters stand for Initialization. INI files are used to initialize, or set parameters for, the operating system and certain programs, native Windows or not. In Windows, three common INI files are SYSTEM.INI, SYSCONFIG.INI and WIN.INI, next to AUTOEXEC.BAT. The files contain statements that set various parameters for the mouse, keyboard, peripherals, screen colors, passwords, and so on.


GUI: Graphical User Interface. A computer terminal (what you see) interface (like Windows) that relies on graphics instead of text. All of those nifty little click "OK", "Next" and "Finish" things that pop up onto your screen. When its 'clickable', it is a GUI, when not, you are not in GUI-mode.

Phreaking: The art and science of cracking the telecommunications (phone) network. Exploiting bugs and glitches in the phone systems.

Wardriving: Finding and marking the status and locations of wireless networks. Wardrivers typically use some sort of software to determine if the network is open or closed and use this knowledge to connect to the internet on available connections.

Wireless Networking: Allows users to share computers, printers, internet connections and files without having any wires connecting them. Uses radio frequencies between computers to transmit data. Each computer needs a wireless network adapter.

Wireless Network Adapter: In "Infrastructure" mode, all the traffic (data) passes through an access point. (Also unfortunately called POP [Poit of Presence]) Three kinds of access points: A bridge type connects a wireless network to a wired network transparently. Communication is possible between both networks and both connections (back and forth). A NAT router type routes traffic from yur wireless connection to an ethernet wired network but will not route traffic back (one way; or the computers can't share files). This type can be used to share an internet connection. The hybrid NAT router + bridge is a device which literally bridges your wired and wireless networks then routes them both to the internet with a shared IP address. This is good for connections to the internet when you have both wired and wireless computers in your home.

Router: A device or set-up that finds the best route between at least two networks. Determines the next place where a data packet should go in route to its destination. Routers create or maintain tables of the available routes and uses this to determine which route is the best way to go for a data packet.

WEP: Wired Equivalency Privacy. WEP has known, exploitable flaws. Provides a wireless LAN (WLAN) with minimum security. Standard 64 bit WEP uses a 40 bit key plus a 24 bit initialization vector (too complicated to explain, so Google IP/Initialization Vector). The key being sent through the wireless network is 40 bits long and depending upon the computer can be broken in a matter of seconds to a few weeks.

WPA: WiFi (Wireless Fidelity) Protected Access. More secure than WEP. Improves on WEP by using dynamic keys, Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP) to secure network access and an encryption method called Temporal Key Integrity Protocol (TKIP) to secure data transmissions.

EAP: Extensible Authentication Protocol. Supports multiple authentication methods such as traditional passwords, Digital Certificates and public-key authentication.

TKIP: Temporal Key Integrity Protocol. Provides per-packet key-mixing, message integrity check and a re-keying mechanism.

SSID: Service Set Identifier. A sequence of up to 32 letters or numbers that is the ID or name of the wireless network. Manufacturers normally ship their products with the same SSID set. (Ex): Linksys' SSID is by default "linksys". While knowing the SSID alone doesn't compromise the security of your network, hackers/crackers who find a default SSID may consider it a poorly configured network and be more likekly to attack.

Modem: Modulator/Demodulator. A communications device that converts one form of a signal to another which is suitable for communication over circuits, typically from digital to analog and analog to digital.

RSA: Rivest, Shamir and Adleman (developers of the algorithm). Public Key encryption used in PGP. Based on the fact that while it is easy to multiply two huge prime numbers to get their product, it is more difficult to find the two prime factors of a given number, especially when those are very huge, like telephone numbers (hint, hint .. :-)

Computer - computing- language:
A set of compiled or interpreted (or both) bundled syntax and logical semantics like human languages.
Computer Languages use NAMESPACES to handle their own syntax and the programers instructions, a complicated translation from binary sets (bits..bytes, registers) to lets say, generally, ASCII characters or to say it friendly : the things you type with your keyboard. That complete set is called the core : classes, procedures, modules, packages,..
The computer language uses its namespaces and hence its whole set of sematics and syntaxis to translate it to raw computer instructions on two distinct ways :
- compiled : the core language needs to be compiled once into raw computer code. The next time a program is executed, the translation is done directly.
- interpreted : each time some code is written and executed, the compiler is awakened and has to do the translation again. Sophisticated interpreted languages are said to be with one foot in the compiled, the other foot in the interpreted like Java and ActivePerl, those come now with a runtime engine and that runtime engine acts as a compiler .. at runtime, indeed.
Both [compiled/interpreted] have their advantages and disadvantages of course.

- computer languages are mostly presented (and learned) as follows :
a) datatypes and identifiers : variables, constants, integers,..
b) operators and constructors : arithmetics, comparing, excluding, incrementing, decrementing, translation, concatenation..
c) expressions, procedures and routines : arrays, lists, while,if,then,else,do and variants, function, parameters sorting and other loops,..
d) objects and classes.
e) modules and packages /updates / versions.
(unlike in human languages where one starts by speaking it , grasping hazardly the sematics and syntax, then learning the alphabet, then the spelling, the vocabulary and then the grammar, then composition and maybe another language)

Compiler: -most difficult item to explain briefly: Computer languages are said to be from high level and from low level.
- low-level languages are those where the programer almost 'speaks' the native tongue of a computer's hardware devices.
-high-level languages are those where the programer codes near to human readable instructions.
A compiler is said, in a very summed up way, to be the translator from High-level to low-level and beyond: that is machinetalk.

Bit: abreviation of "Binary-Digit" : 0 or 1.

Byte: 8 bits make that set.

Namespace: an overall construct, sematic 'caller' to subdivide the set of names and their visibility within a system and especially portability from one system to another: thanks to apropriate namespaces, a program written in C is operative on Windows as well as in Mac, FreeBSD or UNIX alike systems.
In many languages, this is tied to the children computational constructs, eg, classes, procedures, modules, packages of that same very language or variants.
In C : "#include <studio.h>" is a namespace as like "<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN" is a namespace for HTML documents and then <@language="VB" runat="server" /> is the namespace for vb.NET (see http://www.dotnet247.com/247reference/_ ... m.dll.aspx ).

PGP: Pretty Good Privacy. Electronic privacy program which lets you encrypt files and emails. Depends on public key cryptography (you put the "key" to "unlock" the encryption on a server somewhere in the internet void). Users exchange their PUBLIC keys to crypt and decrypt messages.

Java: An object-oriented programming language. Multi-platform (can run on different OS'). Somewhat similar in syntax to C language. Creates a code for interactive web applications executable on web pages by browsers.

Object-Oriented: Programming languages and techniques where the language carries with itself the "method" used to handle data. (Ex): A programmer can write "object:print()" without worrying what object object will be used at run-time and what device will be used to print.

Run-Time: When the finished program is actually executing. The time in which something is run (Hah).

JavaScript: A script language (system of programming codes) which are mostly embedded in HTML to improve functionality. Can be used to respond to user actions (submitting information on a web page).
Keylogger paranoia can be an issue of too much javascripting.
NOT to be confused with Java!!!

C Language(s): Standardized programming language developed in the 1970's. Most widely used pompous programming language soon to be defeated by Java for the pleasure of less pompuous coding when it deals about commercial and media development. On computer development, C is still the boss with assembly languages like ASSEMBLER. Programming in C at home is like redefining the wheel when you write, let's say a simple text-editor, unless you have good friends who are on the same project as you and are ready to write all the libraries and classes with you. In Java, Python or Perl, one would use prefab classes and/or modules.
Variants and upgrades of C implemented Shared Dynamic Objects and C became C++, a bit more Object Oriented as like its younger cousin : C# (C-sharp), which is not ISO-compliant but compiled in Redmond.

Perl: Practical Extraction and Reporting Language still maintained by Larry Wall (a C-shell nerd ;). Rarely embedded in HTML (it is the HTML that is embedded in a Perlscript, duh..) and doesn't download from web pages but reside on the server (server-side).
Perl may produce ANY output that is passed onto the browser: html, text, graphics, you name it. Although Java is way much powerful on the variety of rendering but quite slower, Perl's absolute thing is when it deals with quick & dirty scripts that handle huuuuge amounts of text in the most various ways: governmental and institutes with a great responsibility use Perl to maintain, taint and render their data. On the web, Perl can be recognised with the following extensions : *.pl, *.plx,*.cgi (yes, CGI :-)

PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor. Pseudo-programming language which allows programmers to create dynamic content that interacts with databases. Server-side cross platform language embedded in HTML (then saved with a .php extension or whatever extension the server is set to handle PHP).

Python: the youngest brother (1990) of your friendly good neighbourhood in Object Oriented programming and Webdevelopment next to Java, Perl and eventually PHP. In Python everything is an object and the syntax is kept
as simple as possible. These two given, it makes Python an extremely flexible server-side application language of course: it is a bit as if JavasCript would be server-side ! Very swift and cool to code to
(check questor.py and its source code, have fun!)

IRC: Internet Relay Chat. Live chat area with real-time chats. A structured network of servers which accepts connections from client (you) programs. If you want personal opinion, here is one : it is chaos.

VisualBasic: Programming language created by Microsoft spun off of BASIC. Enables RAD (Rapid Application Development), ActiveX controls and 'easy' access to databases. VisualBasic is pompuous and very eclectic to use. p.ex , whereas in common program languages, a newline is just "\n", it is "_&vbcrlf" in VB, got the picure?
VisualBasic scores a point when it deals with numbers.

BASIC: Beginner's All-Purpose Symbolic Instruction Code. For beginners, all-purpose (like flour), uses symbols and is a code. KIDDING! Easy to learn and use. Simple, procedural programming code.

RAD: Rapid Application Development. Process where a time is set and a small set of deliverables is implemented in a short period of time.

RAID: Redundant Array of Inexpensive/Independend Disks: - we don't know why we put that here- but you might need to grasp to a RAID one day when you are about to loose terrabytes of data within the next few hours.

ActiveX: Software components which enable sound, Java applets and animations and a variety of file-types to be integrated in a web page.

Java Applet: Program not intended to run on its own but is supposed to "live" at some location on a web page.
Java and ActiveX enabled browsers download and use this program automatically. Enables small programs to run inside of web pages. Sent from the server to your computer.

SMTP and mail for later...

Authored by Frankb and LaBlueGirl
"Hey, Crash!
Ever tried walking with no legs?

It's real slow!"
~Crunch, Crash Bandicoot TTR

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LaBlueGirl
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Post by LaBlueGirl »

Necrix wrote:Check out the Jargon Files. :)

later.
Hey, they need to earn their stripes!!!
"Hey, Crash!
Ever tried walking with no legs?

It's real slow!"
~Crunch, Crash Bandicoot TTR

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Post by bad_brain »

real sweet,very nice posts! :D

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LaBlueGirl
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Post by LaBlueGirl »

bad_brain wrote:real sweet,very nice posts! :D
heehee, thanks :)
My pleasure, really!
"Hey, Crash!
Ever tried walking with no legs?

It's real slow!"
~Crunch, Crash Bandicoot TTR

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Post by tnyper21 »

for the crash course

Chaos1986
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Thank You

Post by Chaos1986 »

Thank You LaBlue Girl And FrankB For All The Information. :) This Will Aide Me In My Quest In Being A Genius In Computer Things. :D I'm Already Pretty Good But Still Am Learning Linux And Other Things Like Networking. HTML And That Kind Of Stuff. :twisted: :evil:
If Man Made It Man Can Crack Or Hack It & If You Want To Be A True Hacker You Need To Keep Your Mind Open And Always Be Willing To Learn
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LaBlueGirl
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Re: Thank You

Post by LaBlueGirl »

Chaos1986 wrote:Thank You LaBlue Girl And FrankB For All The Information. :) This Will Aide Me In My Quest In Being A Genius In Computer Things. :D I'm Already Pretty Good But Still Am Learning Linux And Other Things Like Networking. HTML And That Kind Of Stuff. :twisted: :evil:
Do you have a Linux box?

Being a computer genius ain't exactly a walk in the park.
My advice to you is to find something you are good at or really enjoy doing and learn as much as you can about it.
The IT industry changes so often it would be impossible to keep up-to-date with all the latest bells and whistles.

It is also good to know a little bit about how the whole shebang works.

While learning HTML, if you have any questions, don't hesitate to ask me (it wasn't too long ago I delved into that realm) or post it here, of course.
"Hey, Crash!
Ever tried walking with no legs?

It's real slow!"
~Crunch, Crash Bandicoot TTR

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t3st
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Post by t3st »

nice list..:D

thank you for the information..

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sub
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Post by sub »

24. TCP: A protocol used on the internet to handle transmission of data. TCP keeps track of the packets and ensures the data arrives in the same order in which it was sent. (That is why IP was not 'enough..')
Be sure to read ISO-layer and levels of interpolarity of importance between protocols, usually from indispensable to ephemeral:
I think ISO-layer should be corrected to OSI-layer :wink:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OSI_model[/url][/quote]

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Still_Learning
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Post by Still_Learning »

you are a genius, thanks for writing all of that out, all that info is very useful

:)

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DNR
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geek test, you are it!

Post by DNR »

ok, two things

1. check the date.
2. GEEK TEST!, yea we knew about the ISO/OSI switch. We left it in there to ferret out the geeks from the lamers.

DNR
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He gives wisdom to the wise and knowledge to the discerning. He reveals deep and hidden things; he knows what lies in Darkness, and Light dwells with him.

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